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Posted by on Jun 21, 2017 in Blogs

DEALING WITH THE REALITIES OF NUCLEAR VIOLENCE

DEALING WITH THE REALITIES OF NUCLEAR VIOLENCE

Nuclear Ban Daily, Vol. 2, No. 5 Ray Acheson is the Director of Reaching Critical Will. She provides analysis, research, and advocacy across a range of disarmament and arms control issues. 20 June 2017 Ray Acheson Severe, lifelong, and trans-generational harm has resulted not only from the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also from the testing, development, and production of nuclear weapons. Late effects and long-lived environmental contamination will continue to create new victims. This damage has disproportionately affected women and indigenous communities—the reflections of this in the revised preamble are important. For all of these reasons, including provisions on victim assistance and environmental remediation in the nuclear ban treaty is important. Some delegations such as Egypt, Iran, Cuba, and Viet Nam, amongst others, argued that the primary responsibility for victim assistance should lie with the states that created the victims in the first place. Malaysia argued international customary law supports this, including the Articles on the Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts. However, as other...

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Blogs

Pathways to elimination

Pathways to elimination

Nuclear Ban Daily, Vol. 2, No. 4, 20 June 2017 Ray Acheson Ray Acheson is the Director of Reaching Critical Will. She provides analysis, research, and advocacy across a range of disarmament and arms control issues. Download full edition in PDF One of the most complex questions of the nuclear weapon ban treaty is how it should deal with nuclear disarmament. This was one of the main subjects of debate on Monday afternoon, and is dealt with in the draft treaty text in articles 2–5. None of the nine states currently possessing nuclear weapons are engaging in these negotiations—some are actively hostile to the effort. Some claim (for now) to support the principle of nuclear disarmament, however. Their refusal to pursue relevant effective measures in good faith is the precise reason why nuclear ban negotiations are taking place at all. Given this situation, states participating in nuclear ban negotiations have a few options. They can develop a set of strong prohibitions geared toward having practical impacts on current nuclear...

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Blogs

Political messages and prohibitions

Political messages and prohibitions

Nuclear Ban Daily, Vol. 2, No. 3 Ray Acheson is the Director of Reaching Critical Will. She provides analysis, research, and advocacy across a range of disarmament and arms control issues. 19 June 2017 Ray Acheson What do we want from a treaty banning nuclear weapons? This is the most important question when considering both the preamble and the prohibitions, as delegates did on Friday. It will also be imperative when it comes to the provisions related to the elimination of nuclear weapons, which negotiators will consider this week. While the answer may seem obvious—we want the prohibition of nuclear weapons as a means to achieve their total elimination—there are nevertheless different understandings of what that means and how to best accomplish it. The atmosphere in the negotiating room is constructive and dynamic, with delegations supporting and building off of each other’s suggestions, or engaging in debate about the merits of particular proposals. However, there is also a sense that different agendas are afoot. For some states, a crisp...

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Blogs

Lived experience and the nuclear ban

Lived experience and the nuclear ban

Ray Acheson is the Director of Reaching Critical Will. She provides analysis, research, and advocacy across a range of disarmament and arms control issues. Nuclear Ban Daily, Vol. 2, No. 2 Lived experience and the nuclear ban Ray Acheson 16 June 2017 Indigenous and women’s rights took centre stage on the opening day of the nuclear weapon ban treaty conference on Thursday. Sound familiar? No? That’s probably because you’re used to all those other multilateral nuclear weapon meetings where a lot of white men talk about how nuclear weapons afford “security” and “stability”—as if security and stability have nothing to do with the lived experience of human beings who have suffered from the production, testing, and use of nuclear weapons for generations. The nuclear ban, as a process and a treaty, is changing that. First of all, the treaty itself is grounded in lived experience. The three conferences on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons hosted by Norway, Mexico, and Austria from 2013–2014, from which this treaty is derived, focused...

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Blogs

We’re off! to ban nuclear weapons

We’re off! to ban nuclear weapons

Ray Acheson is the Director of Reaching Critical Will. She provides analysis, research, and advocacy across a range of disarmament and arms control issues. Nuclear Ban Daily, Vol. 2, No. 1 We’re off! to ban nuclear weapons Ray Acheson 15 June 2017 It’s game on for round two of the nuclear ban negotiations! Delegations from governments, civil society, and international organisations are rallying in New York City at the United Nations to start deliberating over the President’s draft treaty text—and to start crafting one of the most ambitious piece of international law ever attempted. People from around the world are also preparing to rally outside of the UN building, and in their home cities, in two days in support of these talks. The Women’s March to Ban the Bomb will see actions in Australia, Canada, Cameroon, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, and the United States! The world is watching: it’s time to ban the bomb. Inside the conference room this week and next, states...

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Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 in Blogs, General News

Fate of Earth Must Not be Decided by US & Fellow Nuclear States

Fate of Earth Must Not be Decided by US & Fellow Nuclear States

Originally posted by IPS Inter Press Service Dr Joan Russow is Co-ordinator of Global Compliance Research Project and member of Canadian Voice of Women for Peace.       VICTORIA, BC, Canada, Apr 24 2017 (IPS) – When the United Nations continues its negotiations in June for an international treaty against nuclear weapons, there must be a treaty that should cover every single aspect of the devastating weapons — and leading eventually to their total elimination from the world’s military arsenals. As envisaged, the treaty should not only prohibit stockpiling, use and threat of use, and planning for use of nuclear weapons but also deployment, transfer, acquisition, and stationing; development and production of these weapons—along with testing; transit and trans-shipment; and financing, assistance, encouragement, inducement; and an obligation for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons and a framework to achieve it. (WILPH, Reaching Critical Will) As Eva Walder, the Swedish representative to the UN’s First Committee on Disarmament and International Security, declared: “Sweden’s position is clear. The only guarantee...

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